Captain Chemo strikes again.

Although on a daily oral dose of chemotherapy, I'm also on a 3 weekly course (every 3 weeks) of chemo that's delivered in hospital and by an IV line. 
Before any IV chemotherapy is given, my bloods are checked first. My oncologist needs to know are my white blood cell counts high enough. 
Remember what we learned earlier? 
Too low a blood count and I will start attracting infections which can put a delay in treatment as this chemotherapy pulls the count down further, presenting a totally unwanted situation that needs to be avoided at all costs. 
 
Today's lucky blood count number was drawn on a red ticket with the serial number LUK. 
OK, so maybe it didn't happen exactly like that (welcome to my sense of humour), but the blood count number was 0.1 above what would initiate a hold on today's treatment. So today we were good to go, albeit balancing this with a temporary halt from my parallel daily tablet intake. This whole thing is a very finely produced balancing act. 

Today's prize beauties of administered Chemotherapy drugs came in the names of Epirubicin and Oxsliplatin


 

The Epirubicin is in the delightful red color. As seen here, it is administered manually 
in to my arm by syringe. 
It's side affects are weeing in the colour red and providing a metallic taste in the back of my mouth.

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This is the Oxsliplatin. It was administered by IV line over the course of 1.5 - 2 hours. 
It's main side affect is giving pins in needles in my fingers. It also amplifies any 
drop in air temperature and pushes that sensation to my hands and arms. 

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So it was twists and turns today, and to be honest probably more tonight as I also got an infusion of steroids today which has the side affects (for tonight) of keeping me awake, as per my first experience 3 weeks ago. 


Thanks for taking the time in reading this blog. 

 



Comments

  1. You are really taking this in your stride Aidan,good on you.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks Colm. It needs to be done ✅

    ReplyDelete
  3. Having just gone through all this with my other half Aidan, albeit a different treatment regime and cancer (testicular) I know from that experience always seeing the amusing side in any situation is the way to handle it. Keep it up, we're all with you (even if I don't know you).....#upyourscancer x

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